Things to Consider When Faced with Placing Your Loved One in a Nursing Home: Part II

Things to Consider When Faced with Placing Your Loved One in a Nursing Home: Part II

If you find yourself facing (or predict you’ll soon be facing) having to make decisions about senior care for a loved one, get to work as soon as you can; don’t put it off, and don’t wait until
the last minute. Easier said than done.
Many people feel guilty about encouraging fathers or mothers to consider any of the above levels of care; they might think or know their loved ones will be reluctant to give up even the least bit of freedom they’ve enjoyed for years. You have, however, a dual responsibility: to take care of them and to take care of yourself. If you try to take care of their needs yourself, you’ll put tremendous pressure on your family as well as yourself. And if you can’t take care of their needs, you’ll be doing a disservice to them.
Remember that most seniors in living facilities will benefit from the increased opportunities for social interaction; they might be reluctant to leave the family home, but they could indeed benefit from conversation and new friendships they can strike up at a residential facility. We’re social by nature and need such interaction; the elderly won’t find that as readily when they are living at home alone even if it’s in a familiar place. Their sons or daughters could be living far away, and their lifetime friends
could be facing the same limitations they are when it comes to getting up and out safely.
It’s tough to plan ahead, but it’s necessary to do just that when it comes to making such important decisions that will affect not only your loved ones but also yourself.

Eric J. Hertz, PC
Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers

Sad senior citizen in retirement home