Residential and Continuing Care

Residential and Continuing Care

What is Residential Care?
Long-term Residential Care includes places that offer the above services and more to people who are in need of medical monitoring and assistance. A dietician will consult with a doctor to make sure that any dietary requirements a resident has are met, a physical therapist will help residents overcome or deal with their physical limitations, a nurse will administer medications and injections, and so on.
Still, the assumption is that their residents are generally able to take care of the majority of their personal hygiene needs, are
mentally alert, and can feed and dress themselves though they might need some help when it comes to getting down for meals.
What is Continuing Care?
Further up the scale are places that offer continuing care; that is, a greater level of care than independent, assisted, and residential facilities in addition to social activities, laundry service, clubs, libraries, and others.
For instance, they might offer various therapy regimens:
•physical, for those who are recovering from for
instance a broken hip or a shoulder replacement
•occupational, for those who need to relearn or learn
new ways to open a coffee can or tie their shoes
after a stroke
•cognitive, for those who have undergone brain
surgery
•speech, for those who, say, had their throats operated
on or who suffered a stroke
•respiratory, for those, for instance, who were
hospitalized for pneumonia and need help regaining
normal lung capacity
Continuing care facilities will manage patients’ bedsores, infections, and need for oxygen, but they will offer, as well, occasions for social interaction.

Eric J. Hertz, PC
Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers